Game-based Leadership Profiling

Methodology of establishing leadership skill profile using gameplay data

The mission of the serious game FLIGBY is to identify, measure, and help develop leadership skills. At the Game’s end, FLIGBY provides an individual report to each player on his/her skillset, with a range of benchmarking option available.

In FLIGBY, each player‘s leadership profile is comprised of his or her scores on each of the 29 leadership competences. The profiles are automatically generated at the end of the stimulation for those who had completed the Game. The continuous recording of every stroke of every player, as well as the complex statistical analysis of the results, are done routinely in the automated and pre-programmed algorithm embedded in FLIGBY’s sophisticated Master-Analytics-Profiler (MAP).

On each of the approximately 90 of the more than 150 decisions that the “GM” has to make in the Game, there are anywhere from two to five choices. On each decision, two independent FLIGBY expert teams ranked the answers from the “most appropriate” (in which case the player gets positive feedback within the Game already and the algorithm scores positively certain elements in the player’s skills profile), to the “least appropriate” (in which case, and in all the in-between cases, the skill scores do not change).

On the decisions subject to scoring a player’s skills, the two independent expert groups agreed on what would be the “best” decisions. (In a few cases only, they also scored positively the still acceptable “second best” decision.) Most decisions during the Game are assumed to require (and thus reflect) anywhere from one to a half-a-dozen of the 29 leadership skills. In each instance when a player makes the “most preferred” (“ideal” or “best” choice; however, these labels should not be interpreted literally), he or she earns a point for the decision.

For each particular skill, the maximum number of points that can be earned is standardized at 100%. This makes it possible to determine the percentage score of each player on each skill. This approach facilitates the comparison of a player’s level of skill among the 29 skills and to compare it with the average of the group the player was a member of. The approach also allows making comparative analyses vis-à-vis other cohorts, across industry sectors, by nationality background, by job tasks, and many more.

Since companies operate in different industries, purposes, and business contexts, they often identify quite specific management/leadership competencies. Organizational success typically requires a contextually different blend of skills. Each such “blend” can be custom-made from the FLIGBY 29.

 

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